Pass the Chutney

“The battle began about half-past nine in the morning by a desperate charge made by the Rajputs on Baber’s right.1 Bodies of the reserve were pushed on to its assistance ; and Mustafa Rumi, who commanded one portion of the artillery on the right of the centre, opened a fire upon the assailants. Still, new bodies of the enemy poured on undauntedly, and new detachments from the reserve were sent to assist them. The battle was no less desperate on the left, to which also it was found necessary to despatch repeated parties from the reserve. When the battle had lasted several hours, and still continued to rage, Baber sent orders to the flanking columns to wheel round and charge; and he soon after ordered the guns to advance ; and by a simultaneous movement the household troops and cavalry stationed behind the cannon were ordered to gallop out on the right and left of the matchlock-men, in the centre, who also moved forward and continued their fire, hastening to fling themselves with all their fury on the enemy’s centre. When this was observed in the wings, they also advanced. These unexpected movements, made at the same moment, threw the enemy into confusion. Their centre was shaken; the men who were displaced by the attack made in flank, on the wings and rear, were forced upon the centre and crowded together. Still, the gallant Rajputs were not appalled. They made repeated desperate attacks on the Emperor’s centre, in hopes of recovering the day; but were bravely and steadily received, and swept away in great numbers. Towards evening the confusion was complete, and the slaughter was consequently dreadful. The fate of the battle was decided. Nothing remained for the Rajput but to force their way through the bodies of the enemy that were now in their rear, and to effect a retreat. The Emperor pursued them as far as their camp, which was about 3 or 4 miles from his own.”
Report of a Tour in Eastern Rajputana, 1882-3

The battle began about half-past nine in the morning by a desperate charge made by the Rajputs on Baber’s right.1 Bodies of the reserve were pushed on to its assistance ; and Mustafa Rumi, who commanded one portion of the artillery on the right of the centre, opened a fire upon the assailants. Still, new bodies of the enemy poured on undauntedly, and new detachments from the reserve were sent to assist them. The battle was no less desperate on the left, to which also it was found necessary to despatch repeated parties from the reserve. When the battle had lasted several hours, and still continued to rage, Baber sent orders to the flanking columns to wheel round and charge; and he soon after ordered the guns to advance ; and by a simultaneous movement the household troops and cavalry stationed behind the cannon were ordered to gallop out on the right and left of the matchlock-men, in the centre, who also moved forward and continued their fire, hastening to fling themselves with all their fury on the enemy’s centre. When this was observed in the wings, they also advanced. These unexpected movements, made at the same moment, threw the enemy into confusion. Their centre was shaken; the men who were displaced by the attack made in flank, on the wings and rear, were forced upon the centre and crowded together. Still, the gallant Rajputs were not appalled. They made repeated desperate attacks on the Emperor’s centre, in hopes of recovering the day; but were bravely and steadily received, and swept away in great numbers. Towards evening the confusion was complete, and the slaughter was consequently dreadful. The fate of the battle was decided. Nothing remained for the Rajput but to force their way through the bodies of the enemy that were now in their rear, and to effect a retreat. The Emperor pursued them as far as their camp, which was about 3 or 4 miles from his own.”

Report of a Tour in Eastern Rajputana, 1882-3

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